L'ecole Curriculum

English Curriculum Framework (MYP)

The English curriculum reflects the teaching target for each year group and provides comprehensive learning objectives.

For MYP English, the curriculum endorses an approach that is enquiry based that leads to learning to develop thinking skills and promote intellectual engagement. The curriculum is presented four strands. These are further divided into ‘sub strands’. The four strands and sub strands are:

1. Spelling and vocabulary
2. Grammar and punctuation
  • Speaking and listening
  • Literature
3. Speaking and listening
4. Literature
  • Play
  • Novel
  • Poetry

The first five content areas are all underpinned by Problem solving, which provides a structure for the application of mathematical skills. Mental strategies are also a key part of the Number content. This curriculum focuses on principles, patterns, systems, functions and relationships so that learners can apply their mathematical knowledge and develop a holistic understanding of the subject.
The MYP curriculum framework provides a concrete foundation on which the later stages of education can be built..

Mathematics Curriculum Framework

The curriculum frameworks for Math subject for MYP are organized to the first three years of secondary education. They reflect the teaching target for each year group and provide comprehensive learning objectives. For MYP Mathematics, the curriculum is presented in six strands. These are further divided into ‘sub strands’. The six strands and sub strands are:

Number
  • Integers, powers and roots
  • Place value, ordering and rounding
  • Fractions, decimals, percentages, ratio and proportion
  • Calculation
Algebra
  • Expressions, equations and formulae
  • Sequences, functions and graphs
Geometry
  • Shapes and geometric reasoning
  • Position and movement
Measure
  • Length, mass and capacity
  • Area, perimeter and volume
  • Times and rates of change
Handling data
  • Planning and collecting data
  • Interpreting and discussing results
  • Processing and presenting data
Probability
  • Problem solving
  • Using understanding and strategies in solving problems.
  • Using techniques and skills in solving mathematical problems

The curriculum encourages learners to be confident, imaginative and rationally engaged, proficient of using their skills to respond to a variety of information, media and text with pleasure and understanding. Learners who follow this framework will develop a first language competency in English based on a curriculum designed to be successful in any culture and to promote cross-cultural understanding.

Science Curriculum Framework

The curriculum frameworks for Science subject for MYP are organized for the first three years of secondary education. They reflect the teaching target for each year group and provide comprehensive learning objectives.
For MYP Science, the curriculum is presented in four content areas or ‘strands’. These are further divided into ‘sub strands’.

The four strands and sub strands are:
Scientific Enquiry
  • Ideas and evidence
  • Consider evidence and approach
  • Obtain and present evidence
  • Plan investigative work
Natural Science
  • Plants
  • Living things in their environment
  • Variation and classification
  • Cells and organisms
  • Humans as organisms
Science of Matter
  • Material changes
  • States of matter
  • The Earth
  • Material properties
Physical Science
  • Forces and motion
  • Energy
  • The Earth and beyond

The Scientific enquiry objectives strengthen Natural Science, Science of Matter and Physical Science leading to Biology, Chemistry and Physics, which are focused on developing confidence and interest in scientific knowledge. Environmental knowledge and some history of science are also integrated. The Science curriculum framework provides a concrete foundation for further stages of education.

ICT Curriculum Framework

The curriculum frameworks for ICT subject for MYP are organized for the first three years of secondary education. The curriculum introduces learners to the key ICT applications that they need to achieve computer literacy. It gives schools a flexible framework to develop ICT skills.

ICT for MYP is divided into following strands:
  1. Internet safety
  2. File management
  3. Control: input, process and output
  4. Multimedia presentation – My School
  5. Databases
  6. Graphics manipulation
  7. Spreadsheets
  8. Relational databases
  9. Graphics manipulation
  10. Website creation

Geography Curriculum Framework

The curriculum frameworks for History subject for MYP are organized for the first three years of secondary education. They reflect the teaching target for each year group and provide comprehensive learning objectives.

 

For MYP Geography, the curriculum is presented in the following strands:
  1. The Mountain Environment
  2. Volcanoes and earthquakes
  3. European Union and the United Nations Organization
  4. Mapping
  5. Population and Settlement
  6. Geographical Skills
  7. Africa
  8. Ecosystem
  9. Key for OS System
  10. From rock to soil
  11. Living off Earth’s resources
  12. Earning a living
  13. International development
  14. Our restless planet
  15. Russia
  16. The Middle East

English Curriculum Framework

A qualification in this curriculum demonstrates to universities and employers that candidates can communicate effectively in Standard English through:

Communicative Competence
  • the ability to communicate with clarity, relevance, accuracy and variety
Creativity
  • the ability to use language, experience and imagination to respond to new situations, create original ideas and make a positive impact
Critical skills
  • the ability to scan, filter and analyze different forms of information
Cross-cultural Awareness
  • the ability to engage with issues inside and outside own community, dealing with the familiar as well as the unfamiliar. (This is not an assessment objective but forms the context of writing tasks and reading passages.)

English Framework

Writing to: Reading to:
Communicative competence Communicate precisely and appropriately Understand exact and implied meaning
Creativity Develop ideas effectively
Critical Skills Identify and respond to main ideas
Cross-cultural awareness   Reflect on the familiar Have strategies to deal with the unfamiliar

Speaking and listening are not tested but the development of these vital communication skills is encouraged across the curriculum

Mathematics Curriculum Framework

The curriculum demands understanding of basic mathematical concepts and their applications, together with an ability to show this by clear expression and careful reasoning. In the examination, importance will be attached to skills in algebraic manipulation and to numerical accuracy in calculations.

This course should enable students to:
  • increase intellectual curiosity, develop mathematical language as a means of communication and investigation and explore mathematical ways of reasoning;
  • acquire and apply skills and knowledge relating to number, measure and space in mathematical situations that they will meet in life;
  • acquire a foundation appropriate to a further study of Mathematics and skills and knowledge pertinent to other disciplines;
  • Appreciate the pattern, structure and power of Mathematics and derive satisfaction, enjoyment and confidence from the understanding of concepts and the mastery of skills.
The examination tests the ability of candidates to:
  • recognize the appropriate mathematical procedures for a given situation;
  • perform calculations by suitable methods, with and without a calculating aid;
  • use the common systems of units;
  • estimate, approximate and use appropriate degrees of accuracy;
  • interpret, use and present information in written, graphical, diagrammatic and tabular forms;
  • use geometrical instruments;
  • recognize and apply spatial relationships in two and three dimensions;
  • recognize patterns and structures in a variety of situations and form and justify generalizations;
  • understand and use mathematical language and symbols and present mathematical arguments in a logical and clear fashion;
  • apply and interpret Mathematics in a variety of situations, including daily life;
  • formulate problems into mathematical terms, select, apply and communicate appropriate techniques of solution and interpret the solutions in terms of the problems.

Urdu Curriculum Framework

This curriculum is aimed at candidates for whom Urdu is not a first language/mother tongue but for whom it is a lingua franca or language of study.

 

The aims are to enable students to:
  • develop the ability to use Urdu effectively for the purpose of practical communication in a variety of situations
  • form a sound base for the skills required for further study or employment, using Urdu as the medium
  • develop an awareness of the nature of language and language-learning skills along with skills of a more general application, (e.g. analysis, synthesis, drawing of inferences).

 

 

There are two assessments objectives for Cambridge O level Second Language Urdu:
A Reading and Writing
  • Candidates should be able to:
    1. Understand and convey information
    2. Understand, order and present facts, ideas and opinions
    3. Evaluate information and select what is relevant to specific purposes
    4. Articulate experience and express what is felt and what is imagined

         5. Communicate effectively and appropriately.

B Usage
  • Candidates should be able to:
  1. Exercise control of appropriate grammatical structures
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of the conventions of paragraphing, sentence structure and punctuation
  3. Understand and employ a range of appropriate vocabulary
  4. Show an awareness of register in both formal and informal situations

Islamiat Curriculum Framework

The aims of the curriculum are to enable candidates to:
  • acquire knowledge of the major sources of Islam, its main beliefs and its early history
  • develop an enquiring approach to the study of Islam
  • Identify and explore the religious, historical and moral questions raised in the material they study.
Candidates should be able to demonstrate that they have closely studied the topics set.  They should be able to:
AO1
  • Recall, select and present relevant facts from the main elements of the faith and history of Islam
AO2
  • Demonstrate understanding of their significance in the teachings of Islam and in the lives of Muslims.

Pakistan Studies Curriculum Framework

The Cambridge O Level Pakistan Studies curriculum is divided into two:

The history and culture of Pakistan

This part of the syllabus aims to provide insights into the origins, creation and development of Pakistan, and encourages discussion of issues facing Pakistan. It aims to enable candidates to:

  • acquire knowledge and understanding of the human past
  • investigate historical events, changes, people and issues
  • develop understanding of how the past has been represented and interpreted
  • develop an understanding of the nature and use of historical evidence
  • organize and communicate knowledge and understanding of history
  • develop and stimulate an interest and enthusiasm for history and acquire a basis for further historical study
  • Develop an understanding of the nature of cause and consequence, continuity and change and similarity and difference.

The environment of Pakistan

This part of the curriculum aims to give candidates a knowledge and understanding of the importance to the people and country of Pakistan of its physical characteristics, human and natural resources, economic development, population characteristics, and of their inter-relationships.

Candidates should be able to demonstrate that they have closely studied the topics set. They should be able to:

AO1
  • Recall, select, use and communicate knowledge and understanding
AO2

Demonstrate an understanding of the past through explanation, interpretation, analysis and evaluation of:

  • Key concepts: causation, consequence, continuity, change and significance within an historical context
  • Key features and characteristics of the periods studied and the relationships between them
AO3
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of physical and human environments and issues through explanation, analysis and evaluation
AO4

Apply skills and interpret a variety of environmental and historical resources/sources

The aims of the Cambridge O Level Principles of Accounts syllabus are to enable candidates to:

  • Develop an understanding of the role of accounting in providing an information system for monitoring progress and decision making
  • Develop an understanding of accounting concepts, principles, procedures and terminology
  • Develop skills in preparing and interpreting accounting information
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the aims and activities of business and non-trading organizations, their accounting implications and the accounting techniques and procedures appropriate to them
  • Develop skills of numeracy, literacy, communication and enquiry
  • Encourage attitudes of accuracy, orderliness, logical thought and an appreciation of professional ethics.

AO1 Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of facts, terms, concepts, conventions, principles and techniques appropriate to the syllabus
  2. Demonstrate understanding of knowledge through numeracy, literacy, presentation and comprehension
  3. Apply knowledge and information to various accounting situations and problems.

The syllabus content defines the factual material that candidates may be required to recall and understand. Questions testing this will often begin with words such as: state, define, identify, list, outline, write up, record, calculate, compute, explain.

AO2 Analysis

Candidates should be able to:

  1. Select, analyze and order information in written, numerical and diagrammatic form
  2. Present appropriate information in an accepted accounting form.
  3. Questions testing these skills will often begin with words such as: select, prepare, draw up.

AO3 Evaluation

Candidates should be able to:

  1.    Interpret and evaluate accounting information and to draw reasoned conclusions.

Questions testing this skill will often require written answers and may begin with words such as: explain, suggest, advise, comment on, discuss, compare.

Economics Curriculum Framework

The aims below describe the educational purposes of a course in economics for the Cambridge O Level exam.

The aims are to:
  1. Develop candidates’ knowledge and understanding of economic terminology, principles and theories
  2. Develop candidates’ basic economic numeracy and literacy and their ability to handle simple data including graphs and diagrams
  3. Develop candidates’ ability to use the tools of economic analysis in particular situations
  4. Show candidates how to identify and discriminate between differing sources of information and how to distinguish between facts and value judgments in economic issues
  5. Develop candidates’ ability to use economic skills (with reference to individuals, groups and organizations) to understand better the world in which they live
  6. Develop candidates’ understanding of the economies of developed and developing nations and of the relationships between them; and to develop their appreciation of these relationships from the perspective of both developed and developing nations.
The three assessment objectives in Cambridge O Level Economics are:
AO1: Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to:

  • Show knowledge and understanding of economic facts, definitions, concepts, principles and theories
  • Use economic vocabulary and terminology.
AO2: Analysis

Candidates should be able to:

  • select, organize and interpret data
  • Apply economic knowledge and understanding in written, numerical, diagrammatic and graphical form
  • Use economic data, to recognize patterns in such data, and to deduce relationships.
AO3: Critical evaluation and decision-making

Candidates should be able to:

  • Distinguish between evidence and opinion, make reasoned judgements and communicate those judgments in an accurate and logical manner
  • Recognize that economic theory has various limitations and uncertainties
  • Evaluate the social and environmental implications of particular courses of economic action
  • Draw conclusions from economic information and critically evaluate economic data
  • Communicate conclusions in a logical and clear manner.

Business Studies Curriculum Framework

The aims, which are not listed in priority, are to enable candidates to:
  1. Make effective use of relevant terminology, concepts and methods, and recognize the strengths and limitations of the ideas used in business
  2. Apply their knowledge and critical understanding to current issues and problems in a wide range of business contexts
  3. Distinguish between facts and opinions, and evaluate qualitative and quantitative data in order to help build arguments and make informed judgments
  4. Appreciate the perspectives of a range of stakeholders in relation to the business environment, individuals, society, government and enterprise
  5. Develop knowledge and understanding of the major groups and organizations within and outside business, and consider ways in which they are able to influence objectives, decisions and activities
  6. Develop knowledge and understanding of how the main types of businesses are organized, financed and operated, and how their relations with other organizations, consumers, employees, owners and society are regulated
  7. Develop skills of numeracy, literacy, enquiry, selection and use of relevant sources of information, presentation and interpretation
  8. Develop an awareness of the nature and significance of innovation and change within the context of business activities.
The four assessment objectives in Cambridge O Level Business Studies are:
AO1: Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of facts, terms, concepts, conventions, theories and techniques commonly applied to or used as part of business behavior.
AO2: Application

Candidates should be able to:

  • Apply their knowledge and understanding of facts, terms, concepts, conventions, theories and techniques.
AO3: Analysis

Candidates should be able to:

  • Distinguish between evidence and opinion in a business context
  • Order, analyze and interpret information in narrative, numerical and graphical forms, using appropriate techniques.
AO4: Evaluation

Candidates should be able to:

  • Present reasoned explanations, develop arguments, understand implications and draw inferences make judgments, recommendations and decisions.

Physics Curriculum Framework

The aims of the curriculum, which are not listed in order of priority, are to:
1. Provide, through well-designed studies of experimental and practical science, a worthwhile educational experience for all candidates, whether or not they go on to study science beyond this level and, in particular, to enable them to acquire sufficient understanding and knowledge
  • to become confident citizens in a technological world, able to take or develop an informed interest in matters of scientific import;
  • to recognize the usefulness, and limitations, of scientific method and to appreciate its applicability in other disciplines and in everyday life;
  • to be suitably prepared for studies beyond Cambridge O Level in pure sciences, in applied sciences or in science-dependent vocational courses.
2. Develop abilities and skills that
  • are relevant to the study and practice of science;
  • are useful in everyday life;
  • encourage efficient and safe practice;
  • encourage effective communication.
3. Develop attitudes relevant to science such as concern for accuracy and precision;
  • objectivity;
  • integrity;
  • enquiry;
  • initiative;
  • inventiveness.
Stimulate interest in and care for the local and global environment.
5. Promote an awareness that:
  • the study and practice of science are co-operative and cumulative activities, that are subject to social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural influences and limitations;
  • the applications of sciences may be both beneficial and detrimental to the individual, the community and the environment.

The assessment objectives describe the knowledge, skills and abilities that candidates are expected to demonstrate at the end of the course. They reflect those aspects of the aims that are assessed.

AO1 Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge with understanding in relation to:

  1. Scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts, theories;
  2. Scientific vocabulary, terminology, conventions (including symbols, quantities and units);
  3. Scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety;
  4. Scientific quantities and their determination;
  5. Scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications.

The subject content defines the factual knowledge that candidates may be required to recall and explain.

Questions testing these objectives will often begin with one of the following words: define, state, describe, explain or outline.

AO2 Handling information and solving problems

Candidates should be able, in words using symbolic, graphical and numerical forms of presentation, to:

  1. Locate, select, organize and present information from a variety of sources, including everyday experience;
  2. Translate information from one form to another;
  3. Manipulate numerical and other data;
  4. Use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences;
  5. Present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships;
  6. Make predictions and hypotheses;
  7. Solve problems.

These assessment objectives cannot readily be fully specified in the syllabus content. Questions testing

skills in physics may be based on information (given in the question paper) that is unfamiliar to the

candidates or is based on everyday experience. In answering such questions, candidates are required to use

principles and concepts that are within the syllabus and to apply them in a logical manner. Questions testing these objectives will often begin with one of the following words: predict, suggest, calculate or determine

AO3 Experimental skills and investigations

Candidates should be able to:

  1. Follow instructions;
  2. Carry out techniques, use apparatus, handle measuring devices and materials effectively and safely;
  3. Make and record observations, measurements and estimates with due regard to precision, accuracy and units;
  4. Interpret, evaluate and report upon observations and experimental data;
  5. Identify problems, plan and carry out investigations, including the selection of techniques, apparatus, measuring devices and materials;

6. Evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements.

Chemistry Curriculum Framework

The aims of the syllabus, which are not listed in order of priority, are to:
1. Provide, through well designed studies of experimental and practical chemistry, a worthwhile educational experience for all students, whether or not they go on to study science beyond this level and, in particular, to enable them to acquire sufficient understanding and knowledge to
  • become confident citizens in a technological world, able to take or develop an informed interest in matters of scientific import;
  • recognize the usefulness, and limitations, of scientific method and to appreciate its applicability in other disciplines and in everyday life;
  • Be suitably prepared for studies beyond Cambridge O Level in pure sciences, in applied sciences or in science-dependent vocational courses.
2. Develop abilities and skills that:
  • are relevant to the study and practice of science;
  • are useful in everyday life;
  • encourage efficient and safe practice;
  • Encourage effective communication.
3. Develop attitudes relevant to science such as:
  • concern for accuracy and precision;
  • objectivity;
  • integrity;
  • enquiry;
  • initiative;
  • Inventiveness.
4. Stimulate interest in and care for the local and global environment.
5. Promote an awareness that:
  • the study and practice of science are co-operative and cumulative activities, and are subject to social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural influences and limitations;
  • The applications of sciences may be both beneficial and detrimental to the individual, the community and the environment.

The assessment objectives describe the knowledge, skills and abilities that candidates are expected to demonstrate at the end of the course. They reflect those aspects of the aims that are assessed.

AO1 Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in relation to:

  1. Scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts and theories
  2. Scientific vocabulary, terminology and conventions (including symbols, quantities and units)
  3. Scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety
  4. Scientific quantities and their determination
  5. Scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications.

Syllabus content defines the factual material that candidates may be required to recall and explain.

Questions testing these objectives will often begin with one of the following words: define, state, describe, explain or outline.

AO2 Handling information and solving problems

Candidates should be able, in words or using symbolic, graphical and numerical forms of presentation, to:

  1. Locate, select, organize and present information from a variety of sources
  2. Translate information from one form to another
  3. Manipulate numerical and other data
  4. Use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences
  5. Present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships
  6. Make predictions and hypotheses
  7. Solve problems.

These assessment objectives cannot be precisely specifi ed in the syllabus content because questions testing such skills may be based on information that is unfamiliar to the candidate. In answering such questions, candidates are required to use principles and concepts that are within the syllabus and apply them in a logical, deductive or reasoned manner to a new situation. Questions testing these skills will often begin with one of the following words: predict, suggest, calculate or determine terms in.

AO3 Experimental skills and investigations

Candidates should be able to:

  1. Follow a sequence of instructions
  2. Use techniques, apparatus and materials
  3. Make and record observations, measurements and estimates
  4. Interpret, evaluate and report upon observations and experimental results
  5. Design/plan an investigation, select techniques, apparatus and materials

6. Evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements.

Biology Curriculum Framework

The aims provide the educational purposes of following a course in this subject. Some of these aims are reflected in the assessment objectives; others are not because they cannot readily be translated into objectives that can be assessed. The aims are not listed in an order of priority.

The aims are to:
1. Provide, through well designed studies of experimental and practical biological science, a worthwhile educational experience for all students, whether or not they go on to study science beyond this level and, in particular, to enable them to acquire sufficient understanding and knowledge to
  • Become confident citizens in a technological world, able to take or develop an informed interest in matters of scientific import;
  • Recognize the usefulness, and limitations, of scientific method and to appreciate its applicability in other disciplines and in everyday life;
  • Be suitably prepared and stimulated for studies beyond Cambridge O Level in pure sciences, in applied sciences or in science-dependent vocational courses.
2. Develop abilities and skills that
  • are relevant to the study and practice of science;
  • are useful in everyday life;
  • encourage efficient and safe practice;
  • encourage effective communication.
3. Develop attitudes relevant to science such as:
  • concern for accuracy and precision;
  • objectivity;
  • integrity;
  • enquiry;
  • initiative;
  • inventiveness.
4. Stimulate interest in and care for the local and global environment.
5. Promote an awareness that:
  • The study and practice of science are co-operative and cumulative activities that are subject to social, economic, technological, ethical and cultural influences and limitations;
  • The applications of science may be both beneficial and detrimental to the individual, the community and the environment;
  • Science transcends national boundaries and that the language of science, correctly and rigorously applied, is universal.

The assessment objectives describe the knowledge, skills and abilities that candidates are expected to demonstrate at the end of the course. They reflect those aspects of the aims that are assessed.

AO1 Knowledge with understanding

Candidates should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in relation to:

  1. Scientific phenomena, facts, laws, definitions, concepts and theories
  2. Scientific vocabulary, terminology and conventions (including symbols, quantities and units)
  3. Scientific instruments and apparatus, including techniques of operation and aspects of safety
  4. Scientific quantities and their determination
  5. Scientific and technological applications with their social, economic and environmental implications.

Syllabus content defines the factual material that candidates may be required to recall and explain.

Questions testing these objectives will often begin with one of the following words: define, state, describe, explain or outline.

AO2 Handling information and solving problems

Candidates should be able, in words or using symbolic, graphical and numerical forms of presentation, to:

  1. Locate, select, organize and present information from a variety of sources
  2. Translate information from one form to another
  3. Manipulate numerical and other data
  4. Use information to identify patterns, report trends and draw inferences
  5. Present reasoned explanations for phenomena, patterns and relationships
  6. Make predictions and hypotheses
  7. Solve problems.

These assessment objectives cannot be precisely specifi ed in the syllabus content because questions testing such skills may be based on information that is unfamiliar to the candidate. In answering such questions, candidates are required to use principles and concepts that are within the syllabus and apply them in a logical, deductive or reasoned manner to a new situation. Questions testing these skills will often begin with one of the following words: predict, suggest, calculate or determine terms in.

AO3 Experimental skills and investigations

Candidates should be able to:

  1. Follow a sequence of instructions;
  2. Use techniques, apparatus, measuring devices and materials effectively and safely;
  3. Make and record observations, measurements, calculations and estimates with due regard to precision, accuracy and units;
  4. Interpret, evaluate and report upon observations and experimental data;
  5. Identify problems, design/plan and carry out investigations, including the selection of techniques, apparatus, measuring devices and materials
  6. Evaluate methods and suggest possible improvements.

Additional Mathematics Curriculum Framework

The aims of the syllabus listed below are not in order of priority. 

The aims are to enable candidates to:
  • Consolidate and extend their elementary mathematical skills, and use these in the context of more advanced techniques
  • Further develop their knowledge of mathematical concepts and principles, and use this knowledge for problem solving
  • Appreciate the interconnectedness of mathematical knowledge
  • Acquire a suitable foundation in mathematics for further study in the subject or in mathematics related subjects
  • Devise mathematical arguments and use and present them precisely and logically
  • Integrate information technology (IT) to enhance the mathematical experience
  • Develop the confidence to apply their mathematical skills and knowledge in appropriate situations
  • Develop creativity and perseverance in the approach to problem solving
  • Derive enjoyment and satisfaction from engaging in mathematical pursuits, and gain an appreciation of the beauty, power and usefulness of mathematics.
The examination will test the ability of the candidates to:
  • Recall and use manipulative technique
  • Interpret and use mathematical data, symbols and terminology
  • Comprehend numerical, algebraic and spatial concepts and relationships
  • Recognize the appropriate mathematical procedure for a given situation
  • Formulate problems into mathematical terms and select and apply appropriate techniques of solution.

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